On Either Side of the Looking Glass: Anthropology and Double Consciousness
Sociology

On Either Side of the Looking Glass: Anthropology and Double Consciousness

Double consciousness describes the ‘sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt or pity’ (Du Bois, 1994). It is the result of one’s acculturation into a dominant discourse that ‘yields not true self-consciousness’ and supplants it with ascribed inferiority. Continue reading

Les “fans”, aliénés, déterminés, populaires ? Une approche de la détermination sociale du “fan”
Sociology

Les “fans”, aliénés, déterminés, populaires ? Une approche de la détermination sociale du “fan”

La sociologie du goût en France a longtemps été dominée par les théories déterministes, notamment bourdieusiennes, laissant peu de place à l’autodétermination individuelle. L’étude des fans a notamment été matérialisée par des travaux empiriques établissant un lien quasi indiscutable entre caractéristiques sociales et avidité à être fan. Continue reading

AIDS: an “epidemic of signification” ?
Sociology

AIDS: an “epidemic of signification” ?

This essay brilliantly discusses the concept of AIDS as an ‘epidemic of signification’, which was first proposed by Paula Treichler in her 1987 essay, ‘AIDS, Homophobia and Biomedical Discourse: An Epidemic of Signification’.Treichler begins the essay by framing AIDS as a linguistic construction that creates the impression of the existence of a ‘clear-cut disease entity caused by a virus’ (263), rather than a syndrome that is made up of a collection of opportunistic infections that pre-exist AIDS itself. Continue reading

To what extent are men more vulnerable than women in processes of forced migration?
Sociology

To what extent are men more vulnerable than women in processes of forced migration?

With 13.9 million individuals displaced by conflict and persecution in 2014 alone, conflict and violence are at the heart of many forced migrants’ experiences. Both men and women are affected by – and participate in – violence. However, studies of forced migration tend to position women, and their children, as victims of violence and conflict, while men are only present implicitly in descriptions of gendered violence against women. Such ‘corrective’ descriptions of the experiences of forced migrants serve to position women as inherently vulnerable victims of conflict, while men are the silent perpetrators of violence. Continue reading

Women Peacekeepers : Challenging the Gender norm?
Sociology

Women Peacekeepers : Challenging the Gender norm?

The recommendation made by the UN to increase the number of female peacekeepers challenges gender norms in a superficial way by providing a channel for the agency of women within a patriarchal framework. Upon closer examination, the assumptions such a recommendation rests upon uphold gender norms in problematic ways that must be addressed. It keeps them pigeon-holed as natural pacifists who are more inclined than men to establish and maintain peace. Continue reading