“Ethnic conflict in Africa is a form of organised crime” (Berkeley 2001). Really ?
International Relations

“Ethnic conflict in Africa is a form of organised crime” (Berkeley 2001). Really ?

Since the end of the colonial era, recurrent civil unrest and violence in Africa have been largely characterised in ethnic or ethnoreligious terms. Recently however, scholars have challenged the idea that ethnic conflict in Africa is primarily the result of inter-group ‘grievances’ and have stressed the importance of economic motivations. But ‘grievance’ and ‘greed’ based explanations have obscured the complex nature of conflicts by reducing its causes to a single factor. Continue reading

L’Ours et le Mandarin: mythes et réalités du “partenariat stratégique” sino-russe
International Relations

L’Ours et le Mandarin: mythes et réalités du “partenariat stratégique” sino-russe

Galvanisée par la dégradation progressive de ses relations avec l’Occident à la suite de son action en Ukraine et en Syrie, la Russie de Vladimir Poutine a voulu voir en la Chine l’idéal d’un partenaire « alternatif » sur lequel s’appuyer. Cette ambition se heurte toutefois à la réalité des objectifs de Pékin, dont les dirigeants n’ont jamais été particulièrement enthousiasmés par le concept d’un bloc anti-occidental au sens strict du terme. Continue reading

Carl Von Clausewitz’ Contribution to Our Understanding of War
International Relations

Carl Von Clausewitz’ Contribution to Our Understanding of War

The concepts Carl Von Clausewitz introduced in On War are still widely used in war colleges, strategic studies and military literature around the world. However, there have been much debate around the continued relevance of Clausewitzian concepts and his Trinity to contemporary conflicts as Martin van Creveld seems to have been right when he predicted that after the Cold War conflicts would occur within, rather than between, states and thus not fit the Clausewitzian analysis and rationality. Continue reading